Instrumental Music

 
Classical music describes music that is considered serious or intellectual and is usually written in a traditional or formal style, as opposed to such genres as pop, rock and folk music. Classical music includes music by composers from Albonini to Bach, Chopin, DeBussy, Elgar, Franck, Gerswin, Handel, Ibert, Janaceck, Kuhlau, Liszt, Mendelssohn, Offenbach, Palestrina, Rimsky-Korsakov, Stravinsky, Teleman, Verdi and Wagner. 
 
Crossover music describes a style of music where two different styles are mixed. It can be the result from a mixture of two different artistic categories or styles, or from aspects of one category becoming popular in another. A simple example is Pavarotti’s large contemporary style concerts where opera music amongst others were presented in the same style as a contemporary Pop or Rock show. 
 
Contemporary musicdescribes music that is currently being written, recorded and performed. It is music that is distinctively modern in style, in existence at the present time, musically commercial, especially by being tuneful, up-tempo, and repetitive, and targeted at the general public and the youth market in particular and intended for or appreciated by a wide public. It is often regarded as oversimplified for the sake of greater accessibility. 

DEFINITION: CLASSICAL MUSIC:

Classical music describes music that is considered serious or intellectual and is usually written in a traditional or formal style, as opposed to such genres as pop, rock and folk music. Classical music includes music by composers from Albonini to Bach, Chopin, DeBussy, Elgar, Franck, Gerswin, Handel, Ibert, Janaceck, Kuhlau, Liszt, Mendelssohn, Offenbach, Palestrina, Rimsky-Korsakov, Stravinsky, Teleman, Verdi and Wagner.

Classical music also more specifically describes the style of music composed in Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries. This style is one of the categories within the broader definition of Classical Music as outlined above.

DEFINITION: CLASSICAL CROSSOVER MUSIC

Crossover music describes a style of music where two different styles are mixed:

  1. resulting from a mixture of two different artistic categories or styles, or from
  2. aspects of one category becoming popular in another.

A simple example is Pavarotti’s large contemporary style concerts where opera music amongst others were presented in the same style as a contemporary Pop or Rock show. 

Other examples are music with a strong “Classical” feel pertaining to the style of the music, instrumentation and orchestration, but also with contemporary characteristics (e.g.  music performed by people like Josh Groban (“You raise me up”); the music of Richard Clayderman that is music with a “Classical” feel, but is intended for or appreciated by a wide public, and “could be regarded as oversimplified for the sake of greater accessibility.”  Music from various Broadway productions like “The Sound of Music”, “Showboat”, and also music from productions like “Phantom of the Opera” falls in this category.  It is important to note that the classical or traditional style of the music is the determining factor for inclusion in this category. If music sounds contemporary then it is contemporary and should be presented in the section for contemporary music.

This includes the composition of new, modern works in a “classical style” with contemporary elements. In the final analysis the performance should then have a strong classical feel. Therefore one would not associate a strong rock or belting element with the performance of music in this category.

DEFINITION: CONTEMPORARY MUSIC

The word contemporary is derived from 2 words: “Con” (“with” or “together”) and “Tempo” (from Latin “tempus” meaning “time”, In other words, the word means “together with the times.”

The term ‘contemporary music’ therefore can mean a variety of things to different people. For the purpose of setting the scope of this Prospectus, we can draw on the definition of contemporary music as: “music that is currently being written, recorded and performed. Its genres would include (but would not be limited to) blues, country, electronic/dance, experimental, folk, funk, hip-hop, jazz, metal, pop, rock, roots, and world.)” (Source: The Australian Federal Government’s Strategic Contemporary Music Industry Plan, 2010.)

The philisophy that music could be taught through contemporary music or “the music of the day” requires from teachers involved in the teaching of contemporary music that they – In this ever-changing musical world – continuously assess what constitutes contemporary music, in order to provide their students with a solid musical foundation.

For more information about the Music category REGISTER online in order to gain access to the complete National Eisteddfod Prospectus 2018 – 2019.